Abundance, trends and distribution of baleen whales off Western Alaska and the central Aleutian Islands. Zerbini, A. N.; Waite, J. M.; Laake, J. L.; and Wade, P. R. Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, 53(11):1772–1790, November, 2006.
Abundance, trends and distribution of baleen whales off Western Alaska and the central Aleutian Islands [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Large whales were extensively hunted in coastal waters off Alaska, but current distribution, population sizes and trends are poorly known. Line transect surveys were conducted in coastal waters of the Aleutian Islands and the Alaska Peninsula in the summer of 2001-2003. Abundances of three species were estimated by conventional and multiple covariate distance sampling (MCDS) methods. Time series of abundance estimates were used to derive rates of increase for fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) and humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae). Fin whales occurred primarily from the Kenai Peninsula to the Shumagin Islands, but were abundant only near the Semidi Islands and Kodiak. Humpback whales were found from the Kenai Peninsula to Umnak Island and were more abundant near Kodiak, the Shumagin Islands and north of Unimak Pass. Minke whales (B. acutorostrata) occurred primarily in the Aleutian Islands, with a few sightings south of the Alaska Peninsula and near Kodiak Island. Humpback whales were observed in large numbers in their former whaling grounds. In contrast, high densities of fin whales were not observed around the eastern Aleutian Islands, where whaling occurred. Average abundance estimates (95% CI) for fin, humpback and minke whales were 1652 (1142-2389), 2644 (1899-3680), and 1233 (656-2315), respectively. Annual rates of increase were estimated at 4.8% (95% CI=4.1-5.4%) for fin and 6.6% (5.2-8.6%) for humpback whales. This study provides the first estimate of the rate of increase of fin whales in the North Pacific Ocean. The estimated trends are consistent with those of other recovering baleen whales. There were no sightings of blue or North Pacific right whales, indicating the continued depleted status of these species.
@ARTICLE{Zerbini2006a,
  author = {Zerbini, Alexandre N. and Waite, Janice M. and Laake, Jeffrey L.
	and Wade, Paul R.},
  title = {Abundance, trends and distribution of baleen whales off Western Alaska
	and the central Aleutian Islands},
  journal = {Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers},
  year = {2006},
  volume = {53},
  pages = {1772--1790},
  number = {11},
  month = nov,
  abstract = {Large whales were extensively hunted in coastal waters off Alaska,
	but current distribution, population sizes and trends are poorly
	known. Line transect surveys were conducted in coastal waters of
	the Aleutian Islands and the Alaska Peninsula in the summer of 2001-2003.
	Abundances of three species were estimated by conventional and multiple
	covariate distance sampling (MCDS) methods. Time series of abundance
	estimates were used to derive rates of increase for fin whales (\textit{Balaenoptera
	physalus}) and humpback whales (\textit{Megaptera novaeangliae}).
	Fin whales occurred primarily from the Kenai Peninsula to the Shumagin
	Islands, but were abundant only near the Semidi Islands and Kodiak.
	Humpback whales were found from the Kenai Peninsula to Umnak Island
	and were more abundant near Kodiak, the Shumagin Islands and north
	of Unimak Pass. Minke whales (\textit{B. acutorostrata}) occurred
	primarily in the Aleutian Islands, with a few sightings south of
	the Alaska Peninsula and near Kodiak Island. Humpback whales were
	observed in large numbers in their former whaling grounds. In contrast,
	high densities of fin whales were not observed around the eastern
	Aleutian Islands, where whaling occurred. Average abundance estimates
	(95% CI) for fin, humpback and minke whales were 1652 (1142-2389),
	2644 (1899-3680), and 1233 (656-2315), respectively. Annual rates
	of increase were estimated at 4.8% (95% CI=4.1-5.4%) for fin and
	6.6% (5.2-8.6%) for humpback whales. This study provides the first
	estimate of the rate of increase of fin whales in the North Pacific
	Ocean. The estimated trends are consistent with those of other recovering
	baleen whales. There were no sightings of blue or North Pacific right
	whales, indicating the continued depleted status of these species.},
  comment = {http://www.fakr.noaa.gov/protectedresources/whales/publications/abundancealeutians.pdf},
  file = {Zerbini etal2006.pdf:Zerbini etal2006.pdf:PDF},
  owner = {Tiago},
  refid = {12783},
  subdatabase = {distance},
  timestamp = {2006.12.04},
  url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VGB-4M57H1V-1/2/b2bfdbbff5aeb5d51c6b4ade36f0720b}
}
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